Review: ‘Zorrie’ by Laird Hunt

Zoë Wells Finishing Zorrie and finding out, through his acknowledgements section, that Laird Hunt kept a copy of Virginia Woolf’s The Waves on hand throughout the writing process is the least surprising part of a novel that, generally, does not try very hard to surprise you. Zorrie is a gentle book, or at least is trying to be. It follows the life of its titular … Continue reading Review: ‘Zorrie’ by Laird Hunt

An Interview with Lynn Buckle Author of “What Willow Says”

Zoë Wells Lynn Buckle is the author of two novels, the latest of which, What Willow Says, was published by epoque press in May 2021. She lives on the Bog of Allen in Rathangen, Ireland, where she is a UNESCO Cities of Literature Writer in Residence. She is the founder of the Irish Writers’ Center’s Climate Writing Group and has benefitted from awards by the … Continue reading An Interview with Lynn Buckle Author of “What Willow Says”

Review: “What Willow Says” by Lynn Buckle

How do you fill the gaps where no words exist? That’s the question at the heart of What Willow Says, a novel which follows the interactions of a deaf granddaughter and her grandmother as the two connect over their shared love of nature. What Willow Says is author Lynn Buckle’s second novel, both published with epoque press. It’s a short book – coming in at … Continue reading Review: “What Willow Says” by Lynn Buckle

An Interview with Mark Wilson, Author of “PowerPoint Eulogy”

Zoë Wells Mark Wilson is an author and visual artist based in Chicago. His first poetry pamphlet, PowerPoint Eulogy, was published by Fly on the Wall Press in 2021. It is a darkly comic collection of narrative poems that follow the life and death of the enigmatic Bill Motluck, and the PowerPoint presentation that eulogises him in a three-hour meeting for his coworkers. A review … Continue reading An Interview with Mark Wilson, Author of “PowerPoint Eulogy”

Review: “PowerPoint Eulogy” by Mark Wilson

Zoë Wells With offices opening up and the end of the Work-From-Home year in sight, there might never have been a more relevant book to read than PowerPoint Eulogy, one of Fly on the Wall Press’s latest publications in its “Shorts” series, and artist Mark Wilson’s first poetry pamphlet. Then again, there might never have been a worse time to read it. It is a … Continue reading Review: “PowerPoint Eulogy” by Mark Wilson

An Interview with Ryan Dennis, Author of ‘The Beasts They Turned Away’

Zoë Wells Ryan Dennis is a former Fulbright Scholar in Creative writing, and has taught at several universities. He recently completed a PhD at the National University of Ireland, Galway. His work has been published in a number of journals, including the Cimarron Review, The Threepenny Review, and Fusion. He is also a syndicated columnist in various agricultural journals around the world. His first novel, … Continue reading An Interview with Ryan Dennis, Author of ‘The Beasts They Turned Away’

Gray and white cover, a small boy in boots and a green shirt holds a cow skull over his head. He stands to the right of the cover. The top left corner reads "The Beasts They Turned Away" in white block letters. The bottom left corner reads Ryan Dennis in black block letters.

Review: ‘The Beasts They Turned Away’ by Ryan Dennis

Zoe Wells The old man and the young boy, struggling to make their way through an unforgiving environment. It’s a story you’ve heard before, likely read and enjoyed before, but in Ryan Dennis’s debut, The Beasts They Turned Away, everything familiar is made eerily different. The novel follows Iosac Mulgannon, a farmer, who is taking care of an unnamed young boy in rural Ireland. The … Continue reading Review: ‘The Beasts They Turned Away’ by Ryan Dennis

Blue book cover with yellow text at the top and bottom of the cover. Outline of red lips in the center. Yellow text reads Ogadinma Or Everything Will Be Alright. Yellow text at the bottom reads Ukamaka Olisakwe.

Review: Ogadinma Or, Everything Will Be All Right by Ukamaka Olisakwe

There’s something unnerving about historical fiction that feels like it could have played out just the same today. Though set in a tumultuous Nigeria in the 1980s, Ogadinma’s themes are sadly, infuriatingly, entirely too relevant today. After a rape turns into an unwanted pregnancy, which in turn is resolved with a dangerous and illegal abortion, seventeen-year-old Ogadinma is forced to leave her home in Kano … Continue reading Review: Ogadinma Or, Everything Will Be All Right by Ukamaka Olisakwe