Blog

Along with publishing works by some of the best new and upcoming writers and poets around, we also publish our own content. That comes in the form of a number of things: Gab Harvey’s interviews with indie authors, reviews of some of our favourite books and stories, Dan’s blog about creative writing at university, interviews with some of the authors and artists we’ve been lucky enough to work with, and more.

Latest Blog Content

An interview with… ELIZABETH SUGGS & JONATHAN J. REDDOCH FROM COLLECTIVE TALES PUBLISHING

JONATHAN J. REDDOCH:
Jonathan is a father, a copy editor, a test developer, an academic, and a lifelong learner. He rarely dabbles in writing horror but loves to read it and watch it and occasionally live it. He is the Associate editor in the anthology.

He and his business partner, Elizabeth Suggs, started a company Collective Tales Publishing to publish authors in anthologies. He has worked in publishing and editing for over fifteen years.

When he’s not writing or working on the business, he hangs out with his two adorable daughters and watches superhero, horror, and drama movies.

ELIZABETH SUGGS:
Elizabeth Suggs is a writer, an editor, and a leader in the writing community. She obsessively writes each morning, lunch, and evening. When she’s not writing, she’s leading a group of writers through bi-weekly workshops on feedback and focused writing. She believes these meetings help writers understand themselves in the world and better prepare them for major publishers.

She and her business partner, Jonathan Reddoch, started a company Collective Tales Publishing to publish authors in anthologies. She is also published in a podcast, a poetry journal, with news agencies, and several anthologies.

Outside of writing, Elizabeth devours literature through reading or listening. She tries any genre once, but she especially loves classics, horror, sci-fi, and psychology texts. Sometimes she even listens to audiobooks while playing games because she can stay productive that way.

World Mental Health Day 2020

This year has been shit. Let’s get that out there from the start; after all, it’s not a secret we’re trying to hide. 2020 has been shit. Many of us have struggled through the lockdown months, fighting to keep our mental health in check while unable to spend time with friends and family. This year, […]

Barter Books

Article by Michael A. Arnold Stepping inside from a cold autumn day, you enter a Victorian world of books. Almost as soon as you walk in the air gets toast-like warm – maybe there is a lit fireplace nearby. Paper lanterns hang from the ceiling in the entrance room, and portraits of great writers line […]

Diverse Reading : The JCB Prize for Literature 2020 Longlist

If you’re an incorrigible book lover who is a sucker for unending TBRs and also wants to be a responsible reader by reading diversely, or you’re someone who doesn’t really have time to read, but wants to read all the important books out there, then reading the winners or longlist selections for literary awards is a really good place to start.

Review: One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each

In 2018 Penguin Classics reissued the collection of Classical Japanese poetry One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each translated by Peter MacMillan, which is a full translation of an ancient and very popular book that in Japan is called Hyakunin isshu. This book is a key influence on Japanese literature to this day, and (comparable to Shakespeare in the English-speaking world) is a major part of their national syllabus.

An interview with… Hailey Piper

Hailey Piper is the author of The Possession of Natalie Glasgow, An Invitation to Darkness, and Benny Rose, the Cannibal King. She is a member of the HWA, and her short fiction appears in Daily Science Fiction, Flash Fiction Online, The Arcanist, Year’s Best Hardcore Horror, and elsewhere. She lives with her wife in Maryland, where they spend Friday nights raising the dead. Find her on Twitter via @HaileyPiperSays or at http://www.haileypiper.com.

An interview with… HALEY NEWLIN

Haley Newlin attended Southern New Hampshire University, where she earned a Master of Fine Arts in English and Creative Writing -Speculative Fiction. When she’s not spinning tales of blood and terror, Newlin is likely falling victim to jump-scares and strobing torments from The Conjuring Universe or reading Stephen King.

Newlin has published two novels, Not Another Sarah Halls and Take Your Turn, Teddy. Her love of all things dark and grim inspired Newlin to share the horror genre’s inherent beauty through her writing. Newlin weaves stories of madness and curiosity that whisper, “What are you afraid of?” She believes that horror begs self-reflection, and perhaps that is what makes these twisted tales truly terrifying.

On Being A Writer

Ah to be a writer. It’s a wonderful thought, isn’t it? I have always wanted to be a writer, even when I was very small. And then, at thirteen, I read the Lord of the Rings trilogy. And that was that. I would imagine my favourite authors writing their works with relish. There’s Tolkien, walking around the woods at Sarehole Mill, Hobbits running just ahead, the promise of a pint of ale at the Green Dragon awaiting him.

An interview with… ROBERT FORD

Robert Ford has written the novels The Compound, and No Lipstick in Avalon, the novellas Ring of Fire, The Last Firefly of Summer, Samson and Denial, and Bordertown, as well as the short story collection The God Beneath my Garden. He has co-authored Rattlesnake Kisses and Cattywampus with John Boden, and A Penny For Your Thoughts and Lady Luck with Matt Hayward. You can find out more about what he’s up to by visiting robertfordauthor.com

Review: The Poems on Catallus, Translated by Peter Whigham

Have you ever found something that makes you really think? I was in a second hand bookshop recently and saw a copy of Catullus’ poems, translated by Peter Whigham, under the always attractive Penguin Classics label. It was not going for much, about £2, so I picked it up with a ‘why not?’.

Event Review: Where No Novel Has Gone Before

Singer in the Night is a novel about the Balkans conflict of the 1990s and the long term trauma it inflicted on its youth. It tells the story of the generation that came of age during the war and how they internalised its violence and hatred. Now 38, Clementine lives in modern-day Slovenia, working as a successful screenwriter. But after a car accident leaves her comatose, she awakes to re-evaluate her life and realise that, by distancing herself from memories of conflict, she has thrown away her chance of love.

An interview with… SCOTT J. MOSES

Scott J. Moses is a Baltimorean writer of horror and dark fiction. His short fiction has appeared in STORGY, The Cabinet of Heed, Coffin Bell, and elsewhere. His debut horror collection, Hunger Pangs, is slated for release in October, 2020.

An interview with… NICHOLAS GAGNIER

Nicholas Gagnier is the author of the eight-book Shroud Saga, which include the genre-bending sub series Olivia & Hale and its spin-off The Book of Death. He lives in Ottawa, Canada.

Review: Singer in the Night by Olja Savičevic

Singer in the Night is a novel about the Balkans conflict of the 1990s and the long term trauma it inflicted on its youth. It tells the story of the generation that came of age during the war and how they internalised its violence and hatred. Now 38, Clementine lives in modern-day Slovenia, working as a successful screenwriter. But after a car accident leaves her comatose, she awakes to re-evaluate her life and realise that, by distancing herself from memories of conflict, she has thrown away her chance of love.

An interview with… JOHN E. MEREDITH

John E. Meredith is a Halloween baby, sometimes photographer, and freelance writer currently slouching toward his first novel. His writing about movies has appeared on the website PSYCHO DRIVE-IN. He’s got horror stories in three published books from PDI PRESS (all available on Amazon) and a continuing series on Instagram called RETAIL JESUS. John is a cool dude who hopes, like all artists do, to one day keep the lights on and get his car repaired with the proceeds from his art.

An interview with… Todd Sullivan

Todd Sullivan teaches English as a Second Language, and English Literature & Writing in Asia. He has had numerous short stories, novelettes, and novellas published across several countries, including Thailand, the U.K., Australia, the U.S., and Canada. He is a practitioner of the sword-fighting martial arts, kumdo/kendo, and has trained in fencing (foil), Muay Thai, Capoeira, Wing Chun, and JKD. He graduated from Queens College with a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, and received a Bachelor of Arts in English from Georgia State University. He attended the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and the National Book Foundation Summer Writing Camps. He currently lives in Taipei, Taiwan, and looks forward to studying Mandarin.

An interview with… Jo Quenell

Jo Quenell lives in Washington State and writes. Their short fiction has been featured in anthologies and magazines such as Zombie Punks Fuck Off, Bleak Friday, Dark Moon Digest, When the Sirens Have Faded, and LAZERMALL. Their first novella, The Mud Ballad, was released April 2020 from Weirdpunk Books.

An interview with… Sam Richard

The owner of Weirdpunk Books, Sam Richard is also the co-editor of the Splatterpunk Award nominated The New Flesh: A Literary Tribute to David Cronenberg and editor of Zombie Punks Fuck Off. 2019 saw the release of his debut collection, To Wallow in Ash & Other Sorrows, and his short fiction has appeared in LAZERMALL, Strange Stories of the Sea, Breaking Bizarro, and many other anthologies and publications. Widowed in 2017, he slowly rots in Minneapolis, MN with his dog Nero. His debut novella, Sabbath of the Fox-Devils, came out Spring 2020

AN INTERVIEW WITH… BRIAN SHERLOCK

Brian Sherlock has made it to his early 30s and lives in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne – he was eight years old when he decided he wanted to write novels for the rest of his life.
Chaos Surging, the first part of his adult fantasy trilogy, has been in the works for going on seventeen years and he’s very happy to have published it independently.
When he isn’t writing he enjoys backpacking and eating… but he has no stomach for Krispy Kreme or tinned beetroot!

An Interview With… Carl R. Jennings

The next thing that inspired this story is what worlds and characters can be opened up by examining the small details. There are many times, I’ve found, in books and movies where such meaningful parts of a story are ignored for the “grand scheme.”

An Interview With… Stephanie Rabig

My elementary-school librarian remembers me to this day (I’m nearing 40) because I tried to check out Dracula in kindergarten. I’m pretty sure that was foreshadowing for the rest of my life

An Interview With… Tim Murr

I do have a writing routine. Monday through Friday I go to work from eight to three then I come home, eat, and afterwards write. I usually write until 11. On weekends I wake up, eat breakfast, write for three/four hours, take a shower, eat again, then write for the rest of the night. Once I finish a piece, I edit it with the same routine.

An Interview With… David Nora

I do have a writing routine. Monday through Friday I go to work from eight to three then I come home, eat, and afterwards write. I usually write until 11. On weekends I wake up, eat breakfast, write for three/four hours, take a shower, eat again, then write for the rest of the night. Once I finish a piece, I edit it with the same routine.

An Interview With… Beverley Lee

There’s been a wonderful influx of new writers into the horror fold over the last few years. From all walks of life. Diverse, intelligent writers with their own stories to tell, driven by how they view their world and fuelled by their backgrounds and experiences. I think we’ll see a break away from some of what is considered horror, with more emphasis on cosmic horror, body horror and cross overs into noir. And, of course, the horror of a post-apocalyptic world, with the political climate and the environment. It’s a very sobering thought that this last one might be more fact than fiction.

An Interview With… David Turton

I think historical horror is something that needs exploring more. There’s nothing more frightening that the dark capabilities of human beings over the course of history. There have been acts of pure evil over the centuries, and these acts continue in present day. My current work-in-progress explores the experience of a psychic with telekinetic powers who finds himself in a concentration camp. The setting of real-life evil is going to be an interesting one to draw out. It’s rather like Carrie meets the Boy in the Striped Pyjamas if that makes sense. So I think drawing on the real horrors of the past is a bit of a gap in current horror.

Interview: Lily Hawkes

I wrote the short story for an assignment at university. I always worry about ideas and when the next one will come along. This one started as a daydream about my childhood. My brother and I used to build dens, they were never more than a bit of old carpet but they seemed amazing at the time.


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