The Bandit Fiction Podcast: Episode Five

It’s another happy day as we get to announce the release of the latest episode of our podcast!!! As usual, our podcast features three wonderful works – Scott’s Burial, A Small Life, and Pigeon English – as well as an author interview, this time with Joe Butler.

Episode Five – Scott's Burial, A Small Life, and Pigeon English The Bandit Fiction Podcast

This month we're super excited to bring these three wonderful works: Scott's Burial by Brendan Shea, read by D.G. Champkin A Small Life by Joe Butler, read by David Gregory Clark  Pigeon English by David Cook, read by Daniel Hubbard We've also got an interview with 'A Small Life' author Joe Butler (who is, incidentally, one of the first writers we ever published!) where we talk to him about his writing processes and the story itself. This episode, as well as everything we do, is made possible by our wonderful Patrons: David Brown, Steven Thompson, Jake McAuliffe, Randy Workman, Kevin Bonfield, Zac Copeland-Greene, Joe Butler, Ryan Walravan, Ola Ismail, Gary Evans, Sophie Raine, Danny G. Champken, Sam Huish, and Piers Pennington. If you like what we do, why not consider supporting us from as little as £1 a month. You can find out more here: https://www.patreon.com/banditfiction

Did you know that you can sponsor our podcast episodes? We offer affordable advertising airwave space for small creative businesses and practitioners, a perfect way to reach our 2.6k listeners (so far!). If you’re interested, get in touch with us here.

If you’d rather read any of the works which feature in this month’s episode, both Scott’s Burial and Pigeon English are freely available on our website (links below), while A Small Life is available as part of the digital issue Bandit Fiction Presents… Issue Three (which is available as a ‘pay what you can’ download).

Scott’s Burial by Brendan Shea

My mother was never the same after we buried Scott. When he died, soon after turning thirteen, she wept that it was too soon. Wept he was too young. Wept that no parent should have to bury their child. It was torture for us to watch him waste away, to know he would never again find peace in life. The cancer was in his bones.

Pigeon English by David Cook

Dom entered the shabby bus station and walked past a shabby pigeon, which said ‘Alright, mate?’

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